Dominion Projects Would Deliver Gas to Local Plants

By Jeff Newman, Calvert Recorder

One week remains in the public scoping process of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s environmental review of two natural gas transmission projects that will impact Charles County.

The projects, both proposed by Dominion Transmission, a Dominion subsidiary, will deliver natural gas to two new power plants — the 725-megawatt CPV St. Charles Energy Center in Waldorf and the 735-megawatt Keys Energy Center in Brandywine — with each plant tapping into Dominion’s existing natural gas pipeline.

“We provide the highway so to speak, so gas producers would write the contracts with the end user to provide the gas, and we provide the transmission service,” Jim Norvelle, Dominion Transmission spokesman, said.

The two projects will allow for the daily delivery of up to 132,000 and 107,000 deka-therms — roughly 132 million and 107 million cubic feet — of natural gas to the CPV and Keys Energy plants, respectively.

Dominion would install two 16-inch taps, one each on two of Dominion’s pipelines, near the CPV plant on Billingsley Road, and also at an interconnection site in Malcolm, south of Poplar Hill Road near the community’s five-way intersection, according to a map of the project.

In addition to the taps, the Malcolm interconnection site will include a metering and regulating station that would feed natural gas to the Keys Energy plant and a building that will house electronic flow control equipment, according to FERC filings.

Construction of above-ground facilities for the St. Charles project will disturb about 22.6 acres of land, 1.5 acres of which will be maintained by Dominion for permanent operation of the facilities, with the remainder being restored. The Keys Energy project will disturb about 28.5 acres of land, of which all but 2.1 acres will be restored.

Dominion also will need to build two new electric compressors at its Pleasant Valley station in Centreville, Va., a 7,000-horsepower compressor for the St. Charles project and a 6,000-horsepower compressor for the Keys Energy project, according to FERC filings. The upgrades will provide additional compression required to deliver natural gas to the two plants.

Dominion estimates the St. Charles project would cost $30.6 million and be in-service by June 2016, while the Keys Energy project carries a price tag of $36.6 million with a completion date of March 2017, according to FERC filings.

Silver Spring-based Competitive Power Ventures broke ground on the $775 million St. Charles plant in December and estimates the plant will come online between June 2016 and June 2017.

Construction is set to begin soon on Keys Energy Center — located to the north of North Keys Road near its intersection with Brandywine Road — with costs projected between $700 million and $750 million, said Edward C. Gibbs, a Largo attorney representing Delware-based Genesis Power, the company building the plant. The latest timeline places the plant’s completion date in late 2017 or early 2018.

Public comments on the two Dominion projects are being accepted until Feb. 20. The comment period has been extended from the original Feb. 4 deadline.

Comments can be submitted electronically at FERC’s website, http://www.ferc.gov, using either the “eComment” or “eFiling” features under the link “Documents and Filings,” or by mailing them to Secretary Kimberly D. Rose, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street NE, Room 1A, Washington, DC 20426.

All comments should reference the project’s docket numbers, CP15-22-000 and CP15-24-000.

Those interested in submitting comments can contact FERC staff at 202-502-8258 or efiling@ferc.gov with questions.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s