Tag Archives: civil disobedience

Judge Tosses Charges for 42 Protestors in Seneca Lake Gas Fight

Photo courtesy of We Are Seneca Lake

By Jeff Stein, The Ithaca Voice

A judge in the town of Reading dismissed charges Wednesday night for 42 people arrested during ongoing acts of civil disobedience at the gates of a proposed natural gas expansion in Schuyler County.

Twelve of of the protesters who saw their charges dropped are from Tompkins County. Continue reading Judge Tosses Charges for 42 Protestors in Seneca Lake Gas Fight

Cove Point LNG Protest Was Not a ‘Stunt’

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An activist drops a banner from a crane on Dominion’s construction site.

By Yvonne Micheli, Calvert Recorder

On Feb. 11, The Calvert Recorder published an unsigned editorial [“Protest in a safe, legal and peaceful manner”] calling the nonviolent civil disobedience that took place at Dominion’s Offsite Area A a “stunt” that endangered lives. It claimed the action was unnecessary because there are “other safe, legal avenues to pursue.” Continue reading Cove Point LNG Protest Was Not a ‘Stunt’

20 LNG Project Protestors Argue Their Defense in Court

Cove Point protestors outside the Calvert County Courthouse.
Cove Point protestors outside the Calvert County Courthouse.
Most receive 3 years unsupervised probation

By Andrea Frazier, Calvert Recorder

In multiple court proceedings involving 20 defendants accused of minor charges stemming from late-2014 protests, Calvert residents as well as out-of-state advocates defended their actions they claimed were necessary to protect public health and safety. Continue reading 20 LNG Project Protestors Argue Their Defense in Court

In Court, Cove Point Defenders Vow to Fight On

after trial
After the trials, the We Are Cove Point protectors, their supporters and attorney Mark Goldstone reviewed the day. Missing is Steve Norris, who was sent directly to jail.

By Elisabeth Hoffman, Climate Howard

Steve Norris, a retired professor from North Carolina, is stuck in the Calvert County Detention Center for the next few days. That is not his chief concern, though. And he’s expressed no remorse for his crime. Continue reading In Court, Cove Point Defenders Vow to Fight On

Judge Rejects Necessity Defense, Imposes Stiff Sentence on Cove Point Protestors

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Cove Point protestors outside the Calvert County Courthouse.

By Margaret Flowers, We Are Cove Point

Prince Frederick, MD – On Monday, February 23, twenty Cove Point Protectors went to trial in the Calvert County District Court for actions last November and December to raise awareness and build resistance to a new gas refinery, liquefaction train, power plant and export terminal being built by Dominion Resources in the neighborhood of Cove Point in Southern Maryland. The Cove Point Protectors, as a group, were charged with 20 counts of trespass, 19 counts of failure to obey a lawful order and 2 counts of disorderly conduct. Continue reading Judge Rejects Necessity Defense, Imposes Stiff Sentence on Cove Point Protestors

Democracy Will Not Be Won Without Guts and Solidarity

Whose-side-are-you-on

By Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers, Popular Resistance

Henry David Thoreau became a tax rebel to oppose slavery. Ralph Waldo Emerson visited Thoreau while he was imprisoned for this act of civil disobedience. Emerson asked, “Henry, what are you doing in there?” Thoreau replied, “Waldo, the question is what are you doing out there?”

Most of the Popular Resistance team is in Cove Point, MD right now. Almost all are very likely to go to jail for several weeks after Monday’s hearing for our efforts to stop the Dominion fracked gas export terminal at Cove Point. You can donate to the campaign here. Stopping this terminal is the key to stopping fracking on the east coast. Continue reading Democracy Will Not Be Won Without Guts and Solidarity

Teacher Scales Crane at Cove Point Construction Site

Cove-Point-crane-climbed-2-February-3-2015

‘Dominion get out. Don’t frack Maryland. No gas exports.’

UPDATE BELOW

By SEED Coalition

Early this morning, Maryland teacher Carling Sothoron climbed a 150-foot-tall crane at a construction site in Lusby, Maryland, that is part of the Dominion Cove Point liquefied natural gas export terminal project. She hung a banner reading “Dominion get out. Don’t frack Maryland. No gas exports. Save Cove Point.” Sothoron is part of Stopping Extraction and Exports Destruction (SEED), an umbrella group of mid-Atlantic activists fighting dirty energy projects.  She remains on the crane. Heather Doyle, another SEED activist who stayed at the bottom of the crane to provide assistance to Sothoron, has been detained by law enforcement.

”The Dominion Cove Point LNG project is negatively impacting the environment and community in Lusby, MD. We are already seeing that it will directly lead to massive expansion of natural gas drilling and infrastructure throughout the mid-Atlantic region, from the coast to the Appalachian Mountains. I’m taking direct action today because I’m not willing to let the natural gas industry destroy Maryland, my home,” said Sothoron. Continue reading Teacher Scales Crane at Cove Point Construction Site

Sandra Steingraber: Why I Am in Jail

Protest at Crestwood facility at Seneca Lake, October 24, 2014. Photo by Wendy Lynne Lee.
Protest at Crestwood facility at Seneca Lake, October 24, 2014. Photo by Wendy Lynne Lee.

Author and anti-fracking activist Sandra Steingraber refused to pay a fine and was sentenced to two weeks in jail for trespassing when she protested at the Crestwood Midstream gas storage facility on Seneca Lake in New York.

By Sandra Steingraber, EcoWatch

Breakfast in the Chemung County Jail is served at 5 a.m. This morning—Friday, November 21, 2014—it was Cheerios and milk plus two slaps of universally-despised “breakfast cake.” Along with trays of food—which are passed through the bars—arrive the morning rounds of meds for the inmates who take them. Now comes my favorite time of day in jail—the two quiet hours between breakfast and 7 a.m. before the television clicks on and we are ordered to make our beds and the loud day begins. Between the end of breakfast and 7 a.m., most women go back to sleep. Now I can hear only the sounds of their breathing—different rhythms all—and, on the far side of the steel door—the occasional voices of the C.O.s (correction officers, a.k.a. the guards) and the walkie-talkie orders they themselves are receiving.

Sandra Steingraber, photo by Wendy Lynne Lee
Sandra Steingraber, photo by Wendy Lynne Lee

Meanwhile, my bed is already made and I have repurposed my small laundry basket—by flipping it upside down—into a table on which I am writing. And because I am a writer who is writing, I am happy.

I am also happy because I know that, by writing, I am fulfilling a promise to Ashley (not her real name) who brought me last night a sharpened pencil and a stack of inmate medical request forms to use as writing paper. After hearing my story—narrated through the bars of my cell as I am being kept in “keeplock” until the results of my TB screening come back—Ashley said, “I know about you Seneca Lake protesters. I read about that. But only once. You have to keep fighting. You have to write to the newspaper. You can do that from here, you know. You can’t just sit in your cell for 14 days and do nothing. You have to fight.” And then she ran off and found me paper. Continue reading Sandra Steingraber: Why I Am in Jail

3,000-Mile March for Climate Action to Arrive in Washington, DC on November 1

By John Zangas

They say that the longest journey begins with one step. The Great March for Climate Action took its first steps on March 1 in Los Angeles. By November 1, when the marchers arrive at the White House, they will have taken over 15 million steps.

Thirty-four people started in Port of Wilmington in Los Angeles and will have walked over 3,000 miles in eight months when they finally reach Washington, D.C. Even the wagon trains of the 1800’s took less time to cross the country.

Along the way, they have stopped in major cities and small communities, bringing attention to the effects of climate change and the global need to transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy.

The arrival of the Great March for Climate Action in Washington, DC kicks off a week of actions called Beyond Extreme Energy (BXE) planned for November 1-7.  A coalition of over 50 groups is mobilizing against fossil fuel destruction of the environment. Every weekday morning they plan to block the entrance to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC).  Hundreds are expected to join the Great March for Climate Action on Saturday, November 1 as it proceeds to its final destination, the White House. Continue reading 3,000-Mile March for Climate Action to Arrive in Washington, DC on November 1