Tag Archives: Washington DC

Potomac in “Imminent Danger” After Solar Spill

By Staff, Cetology

A breach of an electron pipe at a solar panel farm spilled millions of gallons of energy into the Potomac River near Seneca, MD overnight. High concentrations of electrons and photons were detected at the spill site and appeared to have flowed as far as Great Falls, Virginia by dawn.

The Environmental Protection Agency dispatched scientists and technicians to set up water buoy dams to contain the spill, but most of the ions had already dispersed. One EPA official called the river running through the nation’s capital in “imminent and substantial danger” of being permanently contaminated. Continue reading Potomac in “Imminent Danger” After Solar Spill

Beyond Extreme Energy: Staying in FERC’s Face

Photo by Erik McGregor
Photo by Erik McGregor

We are Beyond Extreme Energy, a growing coalition of communities and individuals on the front lines—and taking casualties—in the extreme energy economy. We are the ones demanding to be heard, closing down First Street and getting in the way of FERC’s rubber-stamping of fracked-gas projects all over the country.

We have been noticed, but rattling and annoying the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is not our objective. Rather, the permits must stop. The climate-disrupting, community-trampling, enrich-the-few-at-the-expense-of-the-rest system must change. Continue reading Beyond Extreme Energy: Staying in FERC’s Face

Senator Trying to Ram Keystone XL Through Congress Gets Pipeline on Front Lawn

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By Anne Meador and John Zangas

More than 50 protestors against the Keystone XL pipeline posed in front of a replica pipeline on the lawn of Senator Mary Landrieu’s (D-LA) residence on Capitol Hill, calling for the lawmaker to drop a vote she initiated in the Senate to approve the controversial fossil fuel project.

Native Americans and landowners from Nebraska joined activists from 350.org at Landrieu’s house early on a rain-soaked Monday morning. They held fluorescent signs saying, “Vote No KXL!” and burnt sage in a Native American ceremony.

Nebraska farmer Art Tanderup, left, watches  Greycloud burn sage
Nebraska farmer Art Tanderup, left, watches Greg Grey Cloud burn sage

Art Tanderup, whose farm in Neligh, Nebraska is on the Keystone XL route, said a Nebraska coalition was “prepared to do what we have to” to keep the pipeline from being built. “We’re here to show [Landrieu] is stepping on a lot of people, stepping on the land, stepping on the water throughout this country,” Tanderup said. “And she doesn’t seem to care about what this pipeline will do and how much of a potential disaster it is at this time.” Continue reading Senator Trying to Ram Keystone XL Through Congress Gets Pipeline on Front Lawn

Fed Up With FERC: The People Declare Greed “Not In The Public Interest”

Photo by Erik McGregor
Photo by Erik McGregor

By Anne Meador

During the first week of November, hundreds of people from around the country flocked to a little-known federal agency on First Street in Washington, DC. Each with their own story of tainted water and air, health problems, fear for their lives and communities, and concern for the climate, they followed a path to the source of their troubles: the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC).

Maggie Henry, a farmer from Ohio, pointed the finger at FERC for approving a natural gas pipeline on the farm her family has worked for 100 years. “I’m here all week, because [FERC is] rubberstamping these permits without taking anything into account,” said Henry. “There is a 40” transmission line that is 30 feet outside my front door. In March, we had a 4.0 earthquake. I was two miles from that epicenter. My drywall is cracked, the integrity of my basement wall is gone. It leaks like a sieve in the rain.”

Among its responsibilities, FERC reviews applications for interstate natural gas pipelines, liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals and other gas infrastructure. If natural gas is leaking into Maggie Henry’s basement (and all gas pipelines leak), she’s right to be afraid–it could explode. Accidents involving gas pipelines are not rare. According to federal agency PHMSA, there have been 552 incidents so far in 2014, resulting in 15 fatalities and 90 injuries. And there are lots more pipelines on the way. Continue reading Fed Up With FERC: The People Declare Greed “Not In The Public Interest”

Breaking: 124 Cumulative Arrests in Five Anti-Fracking, Pro-Climate Actions

Protecting Our Waters

(Source: PopularResistance.org) Activists arrested while shutting down FERC headquarters in Washington, DC included Michael Zambrano (above) who was part of the Great March for Climate Action. Photo: PopularResistance.org

A cumulative known total of at least 60 people have been arrested in recent days while carrying out nonviolent direct actions to oppose fracking infrastructure. Police arrested 47 activists yesterday alone, in three locations.

UPDATE: Make that total 124. Vermont state police said they arrested 64 people in Montpelier on Monday, October 27th. From “Dozens of Vermonters Arrested for Protesting ‘Road to Ruin’ Energy Policy“: 

“The Vermont civil disobedience action followed a mass rally, dubbed Time’s Up, Rise Up! Rally for Climate Justice, during which over 300 Vermont residents converged on the State House lawn to demand that Governor Peter Shumlin, a Democrat, rescind his support for the expansion of a fracked gas pipeline, put an end to new fossil fuel…

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Climate Marchers Arrive in DC, Urge Action Against Climate Change Now

By John Zangas

The Great March for Climate Action completed an eight month cross-country trek on Saturday, arriving at the White House. Enviros walked their last leg into Washington, DC escorted by nearly 200 people. As they walked from Maryland into DC, they chanted the names of the 11 states they had crossed over 8 months. They sang songs accompanied by guitars and spoke of their experiences. Their arrival marks the beginning of a week of climate actions across the region.

As they arrived at the White House, they called on the administration to immediately begin fulfilling promises it made in 2008, to convert energy production to renewable sources–wind, solar and geothermal.

They read aloud messages written by citizens from across the country. A common theme among them was time was running out to prevent more environmental destruction from fossil fuel energy. In a symbolic gesture of commitment to the environment, they hugged a giant hundred year old oak tree near the White House.

Some walkers joined in the march at points later in the cross-country trek. But all of them gave testimonials of how their experiences were life-changing events. Continue reading Climate Marchers Arrive in DC, Urge Action Against Climate Change Now

3,000-Mile March for Climate Action to Arrive in Washington, DC on November 1

By John Zangas

They say that the longest journey begins with one step. The Great March for Climate Action took its first steps on March 1 in Los Angeles. By November 1, when the marchers arrive at the White House, they will have taken over 15 million steps.

Thirty-four people started in Port of Wilmington in Los Angeles and will have walked over 3,000 miles in eight months when they finally reach Washington, D.C. Even the wagon trains of the 1800’s took less time to cross the country.

Along the way, they have stopped in major cities and small communities, bringing attention to the effects of climate change and the global need to transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy.

The arrival of the Great March for Climate Action in Washington, DC kicks off a week of actions called Beyond Extreme Energy (BXE) planned for November 1-7.  A coalition of over 50 groups is mobilizing against fossil fuel destruction of the environment. Every weekday morning they plan to block the entrance to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC).  Hundreds are expected to join the Great March for Climate Action on Saturday, November 1 as it proceeds to its final destination, the White House. Continue reading 3,000-Mile March for Climate Action to Arrive in Washington, DC on November 1