Tag Archives: water

Potomac in “Imminent Danger” After Solar Spill

By Staff, Cetology

A breach of an electron pipe at a solar panel farm spilled millions of gallons of energy into the Potomac River near Seneca, MD overnight. High concentrations of electrons and photons were detected at the spill site and appeared to have flowed as far as Great Falls, Virginia by dawn.

The Environmental Protection Agency dispatched scientists and technicians to set up water buoy dams to contain the spill, but most of the ions had already dispersed. One EPA official called the river running through the nation’s capital in “imminent and substantial danger” of being permanently contaminated. Continue reading Potomac in “Imminent Danger” After Solar Spill

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Gas Company Sues Tiny Ohio Town for Its Water–So It Can Pollute What’s Left

The Slope Creek Reservoir in Barnesville, Ohio, provides water for at least two oil and gas companies.

The Slope Creek Reservoir in Barnesville, Ohio, provides water for at least two oil and gas companies/Photo courtesy of Concerned Barnesville Area Residents

By Samantha Page, ThinkProgress

A tiny town in eastern Ohio is being sued by an Oklahoma-based oil and gas company that bought more than 180 million gallons of water from the town last year. That water use, combined with a dry fall, prompted the village to temporarily shut off water to Gulfport Energy. Now, a second company has a water agreement, and there might not be enough water to go around. Continue reading Gas Company Sues Tiny Ohio Town for Its Water–So It Can Pollute What’s Left

Environmental Study Shows Potential Risk from Pipeline Construction

By Bob Stuart, News Virginian

WAYNESBORO — A study requested by an Augusta County supervisor identifies potential risks of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline construction to county groundwater and surface water resources, and also measures the millions of gallons of water flowing from the county annually to adjacent counties.

Tracy Pyles said Tuesday that he wants the study to be presented later this year to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission when FERC visits Augusta County. FERC is the federal licensing agency for the natural gas pipeline, which would extend 554 miles from West Virginia through Virginia to North Carolina when constructed. Continue reading Environmental Study Shows Potential Risk from Pipeline Construction

What Marylanders Should Expect Without a Permanent Ban on Fracking

By Wenonah Hauter and Shane Robinson, Huffington Post

Drilling and fracking for shale gas continues to expand across the East Coast despite consumer outcry over the environmental and health risks associated with this dangerous form of fossil fuel extraction. Now, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) has identified new potential targets in central and southern Maryland, as well as the Eastern Shore, in addition to the Marcellus Shale in Western Maryland. The oil and gas industry and their advocates can be expected to treat Maryland like a sacrifice zone in order to extract as much gas as possible unless we implement a permanent ban on fracking for oil and gas in the state.

Fracking is the controversial process of injecting a mixture of water and possibly toxic chemicals underground at high speed to break up shale, releasing methane and other gases along with radon. The process has already been linked to tainted drinking water in Wyoming and Pennsylvania. And storage of the wastewater produced by fracking is suspected in causing a series of small earthquakes in eastern Ohio. Continue reading What Marylanders Should Expect Without a Permanent Ban on Fracking

Oil Train Derailment in West Virginia Causes Explosion, Sends Tanker Cars into River

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Note: The CSX train which derailed in a residential area near Montgomery, WV originated in North Dakota and was headed to a storage depot in Yorktown, Virginia. It was carrying highly volatile crude oil from the Bakken shale. Downstream water treatment plants have been closed because of the oil being spilled into the river.

In January 2014, an industrial chemical leak into the Elk River just two miles upstream of the Kanawha River tainted the water supply of 300,000.

In April 2014, a CSX train transporting Bakken shale crude oil to the same destination in Yorktown derailed in Lynchburg, Virginia, exploding and spilling oil into the James River.

By WVNS TV

12:30 p.m. UPDATE:

Officials with CSX announced on Tuesday morning that shelters for those people affected by the train derailment in the Powellton Hollow area have been consolidated.  There are now two shelters set up in the area.  Those include Valley High School, which is being run by the American Red Cross, and the Glen Ferris Inn on U.S. Route 60.   Continue reading Oil Train Derailment in West Virginia Causes Explosion, Sends Tanker Cars into River

Mountain Valley Pipeline: Monroe Board of Health Voices Opposition

By Tina Alvey, Bluefield Daily Telegraph

BECKLEY — Add the collective voice of the Monroe County Board of Health to the roster of opponents lining up against the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline.

The MVP, which is in the permitting process right now, will stretch from northwestern West Virginia to southern Virginia when completed, with a path that includes portions of Nicholas, Greenbrier, Monroe and Summers counties. The controversial 42-inch diameter pipeline will transport liquefied natural gas.

In a lengthy open letter, Dr. J. Travis Hansbarger, Monroe County health officer, writes on behalf of the five members of the Board of Health, “The proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline poses a significant and substantial risk for the health and welfare of Monroe County residents. The pipeline is designed to pass close to a public school and a long term care center, risking the welfare of some of our most vulnerable residents. Most importantly, our pristine water supplies will be in constant danger of contamination from runoff and turbidity. Continue reading Mountain Valley Pipeline: Monroe Board of Health Voices Opposition

Meet the Insurgents on the Front Line of America’s Fracking War

By Peter Rugh, VICE

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo made headlines at the end of last year when he announced a ban on hydraulic fracking in his state. That was unquestionably a victory for environmentalists, but in neighboring Pennsylvania, however, fracking is still underway. This summer, I visited the northeastern region of the Keystone State to see what the the front lines of America’s shale gas boom looks like.

Far off the radar of Google Maps, I found Craig Stevens mowing the front lawn on his 115-acre property in Susquehanna County. Craig, a former National Rifle Association recruiter, hasn’t had a drink from his faucet in about a year and a half, and for good reason.

“Blood started shooting out of my face,” he told me at his home, licking the sweat off of his gray mustache. “The water started tasting like metal. Slightly at first, then it got stronger. I had spontaneous nosebleeds. Eight of them over two weeks. I couldn’t figure out what it was, but the day I stopped drinking the water is the day the nosebleeds stopped.” Craig had the water tested. “Barium and strontium levels are through the roof,” he said. Continue reading Meet the Insurgents on the Front Line of America’s Fracking War